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Registration for Big Data in Biomedicine conference now open


Last spring, in a blog post on a study from Stanford systems-medicine chief Atul Butte, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD, noted that "we are at a point in history where big data should not intimidate, but inspire us."

The theme of how large-scale data analysis and technology can inspire ways to improve disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment will take center stage at Stanford this spring for the annual Big Data in Biomedicine conference.  The event, which is co-sponsored by Stanford and Oxford University, will be held May 20-22 at the School of Medicine's Li Ka Shing Center for Learning & Knowledge. Registration is now open on the website.

More than 40 speakers will participate in the conference, including Margaret Hamburg, MD, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Nobel laureate and Stanford professor Michael Levitt, PhD; Peter Norvig, PhD, director of Research at Google; and 23andMe founder Anne Wojcicki. The three-day event will also include a technical showcase where attendees can browse displays and demos highlighting public and private companies’ innovations related to big data.

For those interested in viewing the keynotes and panel discussions from the 2014 conference, the videos are available to watch online.

Previously: Big Data approach identifies new stent drug that could help prevent heart attacks, Examining the potential of big data to transform health care, Stanford's Big Data in Biomedicine chronicled in tweets, photos and videos and Videos of big data in biomedicine keynotes and panel discussions now available online
Photo, of 2014 conference speaker Colin Mahony, by Saul Bromberger

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