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Stanford expert to discuss systemic exertion intolerance disease (formerly chronic fatigue syndrome) during public call

telephone-158190_640Chronic fatigue syndrome is not only real, but it also has a new name: "systemic exertion intolerance disease" (SEID). The weeks-old name change was heralded by an Institute of Medicine report, which was reviewed by Stanford's José Montoya, MD.

Montoya will discuss the disease, the name change, and some of Stanford's work on SEID, in a "patient-centered" conference call sponsored by the CDC on Monday afternoon. He'll be joined by the CDC's Elizabeth Unger, PhD, MD, chief of the chronic viral diseases branch.

The public is welcome to join in, and listeners will be able to submit questions during the conference call, which begins at noon Pacific time.

More details, including the call-in number, can be found on the CDC's website.

Previously: Chronic fatigue syndrome gets more respect (and a new name), Some headway on chronic fatigue syndrome: Brain abnormalities pinpointed, Unbroken: A chronic fatigue syndrome patient's long road to recovery and Patients' reaction to ME/CFS coverage in Stanford Medicine magazine
Photo by OpenClips

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