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Rajiv Shah discusses efforts to end preventable child deaths worldwide at Childx

The inaugural Childx conference was held here this month, and video interviews featuring keynote speakers, panelists and moderators are now on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of driving innovation in maternal and child health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

More than six million children under the age of five die from preventable diseases each year. During this year's Childx conference, Rajiv Shah, MD, the former administrator of USAID, told the crowd, “I do think it’s possible to end preventable child death."

In the video above, he explains how innovations in drug development, diagnostics and vaccines are among the solutions that are effectively reducing child mortality rates around the world. But there is still more that can be done. Using global health data to see in real-time where children are dying because of a lack of vaccines and places children are suffering as a result of poor health care, Shah said, could assist in more efficiently directing resources to these areas and other pockets of need. Watch the full interview with Shah to hear more about why he thinks ending preventable child death is achievable in the next 20 years.

Previously: Childx speaker Matthew Gillman discusses obesity prevention, Pediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher outlines key issues facing children’s health today, “It’s not just science fiction anymore”: Childx speakers talk stem cell and gene therapy and Global health and precision medicine: Highlights from day two of Stanford’s Childx conference

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