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Stanford researchers map brain circuitry affected by Parkinson’s disease

In the brain, neurons never work alone. Instead, critical functions of the nervous system are orchestrated by interconnected networks of neurons distributed across the brain — such as the circuit responsible for motor control.

Researchers are trying to map out these neural circuits to understand how disease or injury disrupts healthy brain cell communication. For instance, neuroscientists are investigating how Parkinson’s disease causes malfunctions in the neural pathways that control motion.

Now, Stanford researchers have developed a new brain mapping technique that reveals the circuitry associated with Parkinson’s tremors, a hallmark of the disease. The multi-disciplinary team turned on specific types of neurons and observed how this affected the entire brain, which allowed them to map out the associated neural circuit.

Specifically, they performed rat studies using optogenetics to modify and turn on specific types of neurons in response to light and functional MRI to measure the resulting brain activity based on changes in blood flow. These data were then computationally modeled to map out the neural circuit and determine its function.

The research was led by Jin Hyang Lee, PhD, a Stanford electrical engineer who is an assistant professor of neurology and neurological sciences, of neurosurgery and of bioengineering. A recent Stanford News release explains the results:

Testing her approach on rats, Lee probed two different types of neurons known to be involved in Parkinson’s disease — although it wasn’t known exactly how. Her team found that one type of neuron activated a pathway that called for greater motion while the other activated a signal for less motion. Lee’s team then designed a computational approach to draw circuit diagrams that underlie these neuron-specific brain circuit functions.

“This is the first time anyone has shown how different neuron types form distinct whole brain circuits with opposite outcomes,” Lee said in the release.

Lee hopes their research will help improve treatments for Parkinson’s disease by providing a more precise understanding of how neurons work to control motion. In the long run, she also thinks their new brain mapping technique can be used to help design better therapies for other brain diseases.

Previously: Stanford study points to precisely positioned deep brain stimulations devices for Parkinson’s and From phrenology to neuroimaging: New findings bolsters theory about how brain operates
Image by iStock/D3Damon

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