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Events, In the News, Medical Education, Medicine and Society

Intel’s Rosalind Hudnell kicks off Dean’s Lecture Series on diversity

Intel's Rosalind Hudnell kicks off Dean's Lecture Series on diversity

STANFORD, CA - JANUARY 23, 2015--Rosalind Hudnell ? Chief Diversity Officer, Global Director of Education and External Relations at Intel Corporation, gives a speech on the Fresh Perspectives on Diversity at Dean?s Lecture Series on Friday, January 23, 2015, at Stanford School of Medicine at Berg Hall. ( Norbert von der Groeben/ Stanford School of Medicine )

In 1971, just three years after the death of Martin Luther King, Jr., ninth-grader Lloyd B. Minor was bussed from his white Little Rock, Arkansas neighborhood to a formerly black school. What he saw there stuck in his memory: Plaster peeled off the walls, and the library had only a few tattered books.

“What I had been told was separate but equal was certainly separate, but in no way was it equal,” Minor said. “That caused me then to see that diversity is a moral imperative.”

Now, as dean of Stanford’s School of Medicine, Minor, MD, has made diversity the initial focus of the newly launched Dean’s Lecture Series.

“Diversity is at the core of everything we do,” Minor said at the inaugural lecture last Friday. “To be a highly performing organization, we have to embrace diversity because… creativity doesn’t come from a monolithic, stereotypic focus.”

The featured speaker at the first lecture was Rosalind Hudnell, chief diversity officer and global director of education and external relations at Intel.

“I’m so jealous of the representation of women and people of color in medicine,” Hudnell told the audience. Nearly every child wants, maybe just for a moment, to be a doctor, inspired by the respect the profession commands in society and its portrayal on popular television shows from Marcus Welby, M.D. to Grey’s Anatomy, she said. By contrast, about 40 percent of college students drop out of engineering after the first year.

In 2013, Intel’s approximately 100,000 employees were 76 percent male and 86 percent white or Asian, and Hudnell said Intel has been working hard to diversify its workforce. The company recently captured headlines by pledging $300 million over three years to recruit and retain more minorities and women.

“We’ve spent the last decade building capability,” Hudnell explained. “Then, we stepped back and said, ‘So, why aren’t we better?’”

The key is to set goals and hold everyone accountable, she said. Now, Intel is committed to reaching market representation across its workforce by 2020. Hudnell admitted she isn’t quite sure how that’s going to happen, but she’s confident it will. “It’s time to use our capability and lead.”

And in that regard, she believes Stanford’s School of Medicine has an advantage. “I think, quite frankly, you are incredibly blessed and lucky to have a leader who truly gets it,” Hudnell commented. “It really does take a consistent, resilient leader… They must have a personal belief in their soul and in their DNA that diversity is the ultimate goal.”

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Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News, Videos

What’s it like to be an internal medicine resident at Stanford?

What's it like to be an internal medicine resident at Stanford?

“I remember being in your shoes,” Ronald Witteles, MD, said to prospective residents during a recent Google+ Hangout sponsored by the Stanford Internal Medicine Residency program. “I really felt that Stanford was the best fit for me, so I crossed my fingers and came out here. It’s been everything I hoped it could be and more.”

Witteles is the resident program director, and he joined a panel of faculty, residents, and physicians to share stories and answer questions from prospective residents and the interested public about life at Stanford.

During the Hangout, department chair Robert Harrington, MD, spent time discussing Stanford’s tradition of innovation – highlighting the Biodesign program, a collaboration between the School of Medicine and the School of Engineering, and the Department of Medicine’s Clinical Excellence Research Center, which organizes research teams to discover and design new methods of health-care delivery. When asked to comment on the school’s innovative reputation, he replied: “There is a spirit of innovation across the residency, across the department, and across the university that I think is unique, and is one of our defining characteristics.”

Several programmatic changes were also addressed during the hour-long conversation. Witteles talked about a new initiative called Pathways of Distinction, or POD, which will allow residents to select one of seven individualized pathways that align with their academic and professional interests. Each POD, he explained, will provide residents with a unique opportunity for mentorship and development outside of their primary education in internal medicine.

Additional audience questions ranged from the level of autonomy afforded to residents (the answer: a significant amount, but you’re never left by yourself), to favorite things about Palo Alto, which garnered enthusiastic group consensus about the vibrant food scene and the close proximity to nature. Watch the full conversation above.

Previously: Stanford Internal Medicine Residency program to host Google+ Hangout

Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Stanford Internal Medicine Residency program to host Google+ Hangout

Stanford Internal Medicine Residency program to host Google+ Hangout

Are you interested in internal medicine? Or wondering what doing a Stanford residency is like? Then join Stanford’s Internal Medicine Residency program tomorrow for a Google+ Hangout, where program leadership will talk about the current landscape of internal medicine, share program highlights and answer your questions.

During the discussion, you’ll meet faculty and physicians who are transforming the field of internal medicine. You’ll also hear from current and former residents who will reflect on their experiences at Stanford. Ronald Witteles, MD, assistant professor and director of Stanford’s residency program, will moderate the conversation. Other panelists include:

  • Robert Harrington, MD, chair of the department of medicine
  • Abraham Verghese, MD, physician and vice chair of education
  • Neera Ahuja, MD, associate professor and associate director of Stanford’s residency program
  • Wendy Caceres, MD, clinical instructor and former resident
  • Jim Boonyaratanakornkit, MD, chief resident
  • Kathryn Weaver, current resident

The discussion begins at 1:30 PM Pacific Time. Visit this page to participate in the hangout.

Lindsey Baker is the communications manager for Stanford’s Department of Medicine.

In the News, Medical Education

Future MDs and PhDs: Follow your passion – or don’t

Future MDs and PhDs: Follow your passion - or don't

Rock_Climbers_on_High_Neb,_Stanage_Edge_-_geograph.org.uk_-_752673I don’t think I could explain my “passions” with a straight face. The word itself seems so trite – but one that must be pulled out for cover letters and interviews, I thought.

Not to say I don’t get the sentiment. Passion seems like a key ingredient of any worthwhile pursuit – and a word that career counselors, particularly ones who counsel future MDs and PhDs, likely dish out quite liberally.

Yet they shouldn’t necessarily do so, Stephanie Eberle wrote recently in an essay in InsideHigherEd.

Eberle leads the career counseling center at Stanford’s School of Medicine, and anytime someone tells her they want to follow their “passion,” she demands a definition:

While being passionate about something may inspire you to strive longer and harder toward success, it does not mean you will actually be successful. Nor does this mean success will be worth it in the end. Plenty of starving actors, divorced faculty members, and depressed venture capitalists exist, despite their passion.

Likewise, she argues, one can have a perfectly pleasant career with very little passion at all. One woman became a doctor to support her family in India. Or a man who became an accountant to save up for a pleasurable retirement. And a job might wind up sparking a bit of passion sometimes.

Eberle also notes that career development is much more complex than thinking about passion – it’s a “lifelong process, the culmination of myriad decisions about how your interests, skills, and values connect to real-world opportunities.”

She sums up with some sage advice: “We spend about one-third of our lives strutting and fretting at work, hoping for that one, passionate hour upon the stage. For life to signify something, don’t follow your passion. Instead focus on the many hours which make up that life and trust the process ahead.”

Previously: Stanford’s senior associate dean of medical education talks admissions, career paths, Starting a new career in academic medicine? Here’s a bible for the bedside: The Academic Medicine Handbook and Former professional ballet dancers find a thriving second career in science
Photo by Andy Beecroft

In the News, Medical Education, Stanford News, Surgery

Program for residents reflects “massive change” in surgeon mentality

Program for residents reflects "massive change" in surgeon mentality

Black Read, M.D, Cara Liebert, M.D, Micaela Esquivel, M.D, and Julia Park , M.D. all are  Stanford School of Medicine surgery resident taking part in the ropes course on Tuesday, September 9, 2014, as a  team-building exercise on the Li Ka Shing Center lawn on Stanford University campus. ( Norbert von der Groeben/ Stanford School of Medicine )

“The old-school surgeon mentality is that surgery is your life. The very existence of the program is an acknowledgment that a cultural shift is occurring.” Those are the thoughts of Lyen Huang, MD, a fourth-year resident, about Balance in Life, a Stanford Medicine program designed to offer support to its surgical residents. We’ve written about it on Scope before, and the current issue of San Francisco Magazine now also provides a look.

Explaining that surgical residents are “under enormous pressure to learn quickly and produce good patient outcomes—all while working 80-hour weeks on little sleep,” writer Elise Craig outlines Balance in Life’s offerings for residents: a fridge filled with healthy snacks, happy hours and team-building events, mentorships and friendly nudges to go to the dentist or doctor. And, she writes:

If having surgical residents take time away from the operating room for lawn games sounds a little juvenile, consider this: Recent surveys conducted by the American College of Surgeons found that 40 percent of surgeons reported burnout, 30 percent screened positive for depression, and almost half did not want their children to follow in their professional footsteps.

Some snacks and an afternoon ropes course might not sound like much, but [Ralph Greco, MD, the professor of surgery who helped build the program] and his residents argue that the unique program reflects a massive change.

Previously: New surgeons take time out for mental health, Using mindfulness interventions to help reduce physician burnout and A closer look at depression and distress among medical students
Photo, from a Fall 2014 team-building activity, by Norbert von der Groeben

Events, Medical Education, Medicine and Society, Stanford News

Diversity is initial focus of new Stanford lecture series

Diversity is initial focus of new Stanford lecture series

directory-281478_640How often does a psychiatrist stop to chat with a bioengineer? Or a first-year medical student with an established postdoc? At Stanford, more often than you might think, yet there’s always room for improvement, building community and promoting dialogue.

Hence the Dean’s Lecture Series, a new series launched by none other than the dean himself, Lloyd B. Minor, MD.

Initially, the series will focus on diversity, kicking off Jan. 23 with a presentation by Rosalind Hudnell, the chief diversity officer and global director of education and external relations at Intel Corporation. (Her talk is timely, given Intel’s announcement yesterday that they’re allocating $300 million “to improve the diversity of the company’s work force, attract more women and minorities to the technology field and make the industry more hospitable to them once they get there.”)

Minor said he launched the lecture series to unite students, faculty and staff and to spark dialogue on issues of importance. As for the first topic: “We all benefit from the transformative power of diversity,” he said. “It is an integral part of what it means to lead the biomedical revolution and a core value of the Stanford Medicine community.”

Following Hudnell’s inaugural talk, Vivek Wadhwa, MBA, a fellow at the Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford, will speak on Feb. 20, and Ruth Simmons, PhD, president emerita of Brown University, will speak on May 1. All lectures will be held from 12 to 1 p.m. in Berg Hall at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge on campus.

I’ll be there. How ’bout you?

Previously: NIH selects Hannah Valantine as first chief officer for scientific workforce diversity, Report explores student diversity in medical schools and Lloyd B. Minor, Stanford medical school’s dean, shares five principles of leadership
Photo by geralt

Medical Education, SMS Unplugged

When the white coat comes off: Is “medical student” a full-time profession?

When the white coat comes off: Is “medical student” a full-time profession?

SMS (“Stanford Medical School”) Unplugged is a forum for students to chronicle their experiences in medical school. The student-penned entries appear on Scope once a week; the entire blog series can be found in the SMS Unplugged category.

P1000878In our transition to medical school as first-year medical students, one significant part of our learning has been adopting the dress of the medical profession. Twice a week, in our first year Practice of Medicine course, we wear professional attire and don our white coats, the famous symbol of the medical profession. As we learn how to interview and interact with patients, the white coats encourage us to fully embrace our new professional roles as physicians in training.

At first, the strong symbolism of the white coat made me highly aware of the different roles and personas that we occupy as medical students. If the white coat symbolized my role as a professional, wearing a T-shirt and shorts to my developmental biology class symbolized something decidedly more student-like. In many ways, being able to take off the white coat and hang it up for the day was a convenient way to demarcate our different selves: our professional persona on the one hand, and our “normal” (and more familiar) role as students on the other.

Over time, however, I began to feel a shift in terms of what that my “normal” self was. As I spent more and more time practicing clinical skills that involved helping people to feel comfortable, respected, and cared for, it felt only natural to adopt these qualities in my daily life. After all, after devoting a great deal of effort doing the little things to help make the lives of our patients better, did it really make sense to stop putting in the same effort when interacting with the rest of the world, just because the white coat and badge came off? Is our role as physicians only to help the patients who are sitting in front of us, or should we be thinking about our impact on the well-being of everybody we interact with, from our faculty and staff to the person answering the customer service complaint line?

In some ways, this idea of adopting the professional persona full-time is a scary one. Work-life balance is one of the most discussed concerns among medical students, and many (if not all) of us have fears of our work dominating our lives and keeping us from important things in our lives such as family and friends. Because of this, I have a feeling that the separation that the symbolic white coat offers will become more and more important for us as our careers progress and we become more immersed in our work lives.

That being said, I also acknowledge that, as medical students, the professional persona can help us to consider our daily impact on the world around us, which just might influence the health and happiness of a few extra people each day. For now, then, I’m willing to admit that perhaps there is a little more value to taking our professional mindset home with us than I first realized.

Nathaniel Fleming is a first-year medical student and a native Oregonian. His interests include health policy and clinical research. 

Photo courtesy of Nathaniel Fleming

Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine Music Network brings together healers, musicians and music lovers

Stanford Medicine Music Network brings together healers, musicians and music lovers

sarahkenricMore than 100 physicians, students and members of the Stanford community gathered last week at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge for the inaugural concert of the Stanford Medicine Music Network.

During the event, Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the medical school, told the audience, “It is so gratifying to be here this evening, and to see that musicians in the medical community have a means to continue to play and perform.” Music was a big part of Minor’s life in medical school and he played the cello in a musical trio that played at various events during that time.

The network was launched last year after Minor and Steve Goodman, MD, PhD, associate dean for research and translational science, discovered they both attended a 1976 cello performance by Yo-Yo Ma, who was then a student at Harvard. The shared memory inspired them to establish a musical home for the medical community. They joined forces with Audrey Shafer, MD, professor of anesthesiology and director of the Medicine and Muse Program, and Ben Robison, a medical student and professional violinist, and created the Stanford Medicine Music Network (SMMN, pronounced “summon”).

Among the goals of the network are to connect musicians for group practices, organize chamber music and string quartet groups and stage performances at Stanford and in the surrounding community in an effort to contribute to healthy communities.

The concert featured classical and contemporary music as well as a special gift presentation by Charles Prober, MD, senior associate dean of medical education, thanking medical student Kenric Tam and his parents, Carol and Kingsang, for their generous donation of a grand piano. The piano, which will reside outside Paul Berg Hall, will be available for events and members of the Stanford Medicine community to play.

As the program ended, Goodman noted in his concluding remarks that the word “summon” describes multiple aspects of what the network represents. “As musicians, we are summoned to perform, and this in turn summons those who care to listen,” he said. “As physicians and medical students, many of us are answering a summons we felt to care for others, and I think keeping music in our lives allows us to do a better job of that.”

Previously: Stanford’s Medicine and the Muse symposium features author of “The Kite Runner”“Deconstructed Pain:” Medicine meets fine artsStanford network launched to connect musicians, music lovers and What physicians can learn from musicians

Emergency Medicine, Medical Education, Patient Care, SMS Unplugged

Role reversal: How I went from med student to ED patient in under two minutes

Role reversal: How I went from med student to ED patient in under two minutes

SMS (“Stanford Medical School”) Unplugged is a forum for students to chronicle their experiences in medical school. The student-penned entries appear on Scope once a week; the entire blog series can be found in the SMS Unplugged category.

emergency sign - smallAs part of the second-year clinical skills course, each member of my class is required to complete two 8-hour Emergency Department (ED) shifts. I had my first ED shift last week, and when I walked in, I introduced myself as a second-year medical student who needed to practice IV placements, EKGs, and any other procedures that happened to come my way. Three hours later, when I walked out of the ED, staff knew me not as a medical student, but as a recently discharged patient, grasping paperwork with my official diagnosis: “syncope and collapse.”

It was 30 minutes into my ED shift, while I was watching a pelvic exam (ironic, given my post a couple weeks ago), when I began to feel a little dizzy. I’ve fainted twice before – once in high school after getting my blood drawn, and once when watching a C-section at a clinic in India – so I recognized the signs: feeling a little hot, starting to see black dots, slightly swaying. I tried to fight off the sensation by breathing slowly, but I could tell it wasn’t working. At the earliest possible opportunity, I turned to the attending in the room, saying, “Is it okay if I leave? I’m feeling lightheaded.”

I barely waited to hear her response before I bolted out of the room and found the closest stool to sit on. Bad call. The stool had no back to it, and next thing I knew, I was on the ground. When I opened my eyes, there were at least five  nurses around me, one whom matter-of-factly said, “Honey, you just became a patient.” Another nurse quietly slipped my hospital badge off my jacket, returning two minutes later with a medical bracelet that she fastened around my wrist.

My memory of those early moments is a little shaky, but I do remember saying over and over again, “I’m so sorry, I’m so sorry.” I felt awful that I had come to the ED to learn from the patients, physicians, and staff – without being a burden – but had ended up being another patient for whom they had to provide care. The nurses and attendings immediately normalized the situation, telling me repeatedly that this is a common occurrence in the ED and that many of them had had this happen to them as well. Their assurances made me feel so much better.

The efficiency of the events that followed totally impressed me. The nurse helping me to the bed did the fastest history on me I’ve ever heard, all while hooking me up to a BP cuff and a pulse oximeter. Did I have allergies? (Nope.) Did I  have diabetes? (Nope.) When was the last time I ate? (That morning). Any other medical conditions that I’m being treated for? (Nope.) Any family history of cardiac conditions? (Nope.)

The attending who was with me when I initially felt lightheaded came in at that point and asked, “Has this happened to you before?” and when I told her about the C-section, joked, “ObGyn probably isn’t your favorite thing, huh?” She then laid out the plan for what would happen next: an EKG, a glucose stick, and a blood test, to check for cardiac abnormalities, low blood sugar, and anemia, respectively. Within 30 minutes, all three of these had been done, and I even got a bonus ultrasound thrown in by someone who was practicing recognizing cardiac pathology (not that I had any). Noticing my scrubs and med student badge, this person took the time to show me each ultrasound image, pointing out the various heart chambers, valves, and the location where my IVC entered my right atrium.

By 2 PM, my tests were all back, everything was normal, and I was able to laugh about the entire situation: Somehow, I had come into the ED hoping to practice blood draws and EKGs but came out having them done to me instead. Just another day in the life of a med student.

Hamsika Chandrasekar is a second-year student at Stanford’s medical school. She has an interest in medical education and pediatrics.

Photo by zoomar

 

In the News, Infectious Disease, Medical Education, Medicine and Society, Patient Care

A doctor’s attire – what works best?

A doctor’s attire – what works best?

Lab CoatsDoes what your doctor wear matter to you? You may simply want your doctor to be competent and compassionate, but a recent article in The Atlantic points out some subtle issues in the effects a doctor’s dress may have. Most people seem to prefer “formal” to “casual,” but the author recalls being put off by a well-coiffed female doctor dressed in a smart business suit. But if there’s such a thing as too formal, a doctor in cut-off shorts and a tee isn’t likely to get too many repeat patients either.

I’m pregnant and I have a toddler, so I’ve had more than the average number of visits to the doctor in the past couple of years. I also like clothes and notice what people are wearing, but even I had to stop and think about what, if anything, I remembered about what my OB/GYN or my daughter’s pediatrician (both women) wore during recent visits. Mostly I remember slacks and simple blouses, or in the unforgiving summer heat typical in this area, something a little lighter. My daughter’s pediatrician also has a couple of small Disney character toys attached to her name tag to entertain the youngest patients.

There’s a middle ground that doctors have to strike that may be tricky depending on their specialty, their hospital or clinic’s dress codes (Mayo Clinic requires all docs to dress in a business suit) among other things. And that’s not even considering the issue of how a doctor’s clothes can spread infectious disease. From the article:

The definition of what counts as professional clothing is also in flux, thanks to increasing knowledge of infectious risks. Earlier this year, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology Association (SHEA) published new guidelines for healthcare-personnel attire in hospital settings. Their goal was to balance the need for professional appearance with the obligation to minimize potential germ transmission via clothing and other doodads like ID badges and jewelry and neckties that might touch body parts or bodily fluids. The SHEA investigators’ take-home points regarding infection: White coats should be washed weekly, at the minimum; neckties should be clipped in place (70 percent of doctors in two studies admitted to having never had a tie cleaned); and institutions should strongly consider a “bare below the elbow” (BBE) policy, meaning short sleeves and no wristwatches or jewelry. Although the impact on reducing the risk of infections remains to be determined, it’s considered potentially significant enough that a number of countries have adopted BBE requirements for all clinicians. (And it leaves me wondering: When will the Mayo clinic update its dress code to short-sleeved business suits?)

The other factor doctors have to consider is that the “business casual” that I’ve seen on most doctors may need to be upgraded for more formal meetings – something I’d never considered as a patient. Again from the article:

Last week, two days in a row, I ran into a colleague who’s a pediatrician. The first day, she wore a beige pantsuit (I’d label it formal, or business) and looked fairly corporate. I wondered to myself if she realized that her clothes were sending a message to her patients, a message that indicated that her medical practice was a business and that she wielded the power. The next day, she wore a loose-fitting knee-length navy dress (professional informal, perhaps, or smart casual). I asked her if she had seen patients the first day. She had not; it was a day of meetings, and when I told her I was writing about doctors’ clothing, she laughed. “When you’re seeing patients,” she said, “you have to look like you’re not afraid to get dirty.”

I’m not sure how I would have reacted if at our first appointment our pediatrician had worn a formal business suit. At the very least, I would have felt under-dressed (jeans and tees are my de facto uniform these days), but I would have likely judged her as cool or somehow distant, not suited to working with kids. Which may prove nothing, but only hint that that the best attire is the kind that your patients don’t notice.

Previously: NY bill proposes banning white coats, ties for doctors
Photo by Pi

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