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Medical Education, Medical Schools, Medicine and Society, Stanford News, Surgery

How two women from different worlds are changing the face of surgery

How two women from different worlds are changing the face of surgery

IMG_1038“I hope you’re not serious about doing something in medicine.”

These words are all too familiar to Annete Bongiwe Moyo, a senior medical student at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences in Harare, Zimbabwe, and a former Stanford visiting scholar. In Zimbabwe, where the proportion of men to women in medical school is roughly 3:1, women are encouraged to take up professions as teachers, artists, caregivers – not doctors. And for a woman thinking about becoming a surgeon, well, she might as well keep dreaming.

Though the odds were stacked against her, Moyo made the decision to become a doctor at a very young age. But it wasn’t until she met Stanford surgeon Sherry Wren, MD, that she started to believe that becoming a surgeon was a realistic goal.

The outlook for women in surgery in Zimbabwe is not terribly unlike that in the U.S. when Wren began her residency at Yale University almost 30 years ago. After receiving her medical degree from Loyola University, Wren became the first woman from the university to specialize in surgery. At that time, only 12 percent of surgical residents were women, and the number of women surgeons in the workforce was far less.

But Wren has never let her womanhood hold her back. In fact, her powerhouse personality, fearlessness and passion for her work are the very traits that define her. She has worked all over the world, applying her skill and resourcefulness to provide the best possible care, often with extremely limited resources in remote locations. In many of these places, Wren is often the first woman surgeon anyone has ever seen.

Shocked too was Moyo when Wren appeared on her surgery rotation at the University of Zimbabwe two years ago. Here’s how Moyo recalls their first encounter – one that would have a lasting impact:

[Wren] was a visiting professor in a grand rounds. Medical students are not usually invited to grand rounds, but that day, we were permitted to attend. When the presentation was done, she asked a question, and when she looked my way, she could tell I knew the answer. She called on me, but one of my professors said ‘Wait, she’s a third year student, she may not know what you’re talking about.’ But Prof. Wren insisted, and I answered correctly. So she asked another question, and I got it right. And then another, and I got it right again.

The mood had shifted in the room. No one expected a junior female medical student could be capable of such an eloquent response. No one had ever given her the chance.

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Medical Education, Medical Schools, Medicine and Society, Research, SMS Unplugged

Research in medical school: The need to align incentives with value (part 3)

Research in medical school: The need to align incentives with value (part 3)

SMS (“Stanford Medical School”) Unplugged is a forum for students to chronicle their experiences in medical school. The student-penned entries appear on Scope once a week during the academic year; the entire blog series can be found in the SMS Unplugged category.

This is the final post in a three-part series on research in medical school. Parts one and two are available here.

confusion-311388_1280In my last two posts, I explored the research paradigm of American medical training. The takeaway was that research requirements may create inefficiencies that have a host of consequences, including an unnecessarily long training process, a potential physician shortage, and an underutilization of talent.

In this post, I’ll lay out a vision for a training process that can produce a more effective physician workforce. The role of a physician has changed over time, and the education system must evolve to keep up. I’ll consider three topics: what students should get out of medical training, how schools and residency programs can help them do it, and how the system at large can enable schools to make changes.

What should students get out of medical training?

First and foremost, medical training should produce doctors who have a strong understanding of human health and disease and have the clinical skills to translate that understanding into patient care. The goal should be to produce good clinicians – that’s what the vast majority of doctors will focus on in their careers.

With that said, I accept the premise that medical training is not exclusively about clinical skills. Physicians are bright, capable individuals, and are uniquely positioned to improve the health status of their patients by other means. Schools should empower their students to pursue those opportunities. For the reasons I discussed in my last post, medical schools have decided that the primary way to do that is through research.

Research is one way to push extraordinarily important advances in medicine, but it isn’t the only way. Doctors can also improve their patients’ health by taking on roles in community health, policy, entrepreneurship or management, among others. These involve many of the same skills and techniques as research, but medical trainees don’t get exposed to these opportunities. We should.

How can schools fulfill this mission?

So how can the education system make this happen? At some point, whether it is in college or medical school, students should be given the flexibility to explore multiple domains of medicine and health care. They should then be able to pick the one or two that fit their interests and pursue them in more depth. Many students will choose to do research, while others will select other specialties. If students explore these opportunities and decide that they would rather focus on being an excellent clinician, that should also be doable.

This would allow physicians to become more effective leaders and decision-makers in the health care system. The traditional training process treats medicine as a universe of clinical practice and research, but the physician workforce has unfulfilled potential across a spectrum of other fields.

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Cancer, Medical Education, Medicine and Society, Patient Care

Cancer Ninja fights patient misinformation, one cartoon at a time

Screen Shot 2015-06-15 at 1.16.14 PMThere seems to be a trend towards using cartoons for health education: In just the past few months, we’ve posted on children’s books, depression blogs, global-health videos, and art-based clinical skills, all using non-realist art to convey information and qualitative experience. A new blog by Andrew Howard, MD, radiation oncologist at the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago, fits right in with this innovative bunch. His blog, Cancer Ninja, aims to use cartoons to convey both how cancer works and what it’s like to be diagnosed and treated for it. Howard started it just one month ago, so his project was fresh from the creative oven when I spoke with him on the phone last week.

What motivated you to start Cancer Ninja?

I’d been frustrated for a while with how little my patients know about cancer. They come in with all these confusions; they don’t understand the difference between chemotherapy and radiation (and from a doctor’s perspective, there’s a huge difference). They don’t understand our rationale for choosing one treatment or another or a combination. One patient was convinced that hot sauce caused cancer and was really upset that she had gotten cancer because she had gone out of her way to avoid hot sauce all of her life. I realized there is a lot of misinformation out there, and that was the purpose for starting this blog.

My wife and I have two little girls, and in the evenings sometimes they say, ‘Draw dinosaurs with me, Daddy!’ So I started drawing with them, and I enjoyed it so much that I would sometimes stay up at night after they had gone to bed, still working on my dinosaur. My wife saw me enjoying that a lot, and thought maybe I could combine this with educating people about cancer.

Your website is targeted to be generally informative about cancer; why did you start with breast cancer? 

Breast cancer is really common in this country, unfortunately, and it’s also very well studied, so we understand a lot about it, which makes it a nice model. There’s a pretty clear algorithm for the proper way to treat a patient with such and such stage breast cancer, so it makes it easy to follow along.

How many characters or episodes are you hoping to do? So far, there’s just “Jane.” 

Screen Shot 2015-06-16 at 1.36.59 PMI’m kind of experimenting. I envision that I’m going to follow Jane though her diagnosis and treatment, but my wife told me that Jane can’t die; she really likes Jane. But 40 percent of people with cancer will ultimately die of their disease, so I want to draw and write about what it’s like to be confronting one’s death, at least as I have witnessed it. What can medicine offer those people, and what can’t it? So I want to introduce a character who dies. I feel like there’s so much that’s already happened in Jane’s story, and I could go back and fill in the details. The mutation steps that turn a cell into a cancer cell, that’s actually a really complicated transformation that I could explore in greater depth.

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Medical Education, Patient Care, Stanford News, Surgery, Videos

Why become a doctor? A personal story from a Stanford plastic surgeon

Why become a doctor? A personal story from a Stanford plastic surgeon

Recent graduates: Never fear if you haven’t picked a career yet; it’s never too late to figure out what you want to do when you grow up. I’m on my third career, and Rahim Nazerali, MD, now an assistant professor of surgery at Stanford, is on his second.

He explains in this recent Stanford Health Care video:

I had a career in international health and I felt like I wasn’t interacting with enough people, I was doing a lot of behind the desk work and I never really interacted with the people I was affecting. I entered medicine for that reason.

And when he entered medical school at Brown University, Nazerali thought he would pursue emergency medicine or orthopedics. But he was wrong again. In the video, he describes a surgery — which he watched on his first day on a plastic surgery rotation — that convinced him that this field was the one for him. Plastic surgeons converted a gaping post-tumor chest hole into a natural looking chest: “You could hardly even tell that anyone was there,” Nazerali said. “At that point, I thought, ‘I want to do that.'”

Now, he’s on the front lines of patient care, where he hopes to stay.

“Many patients come back in after they have their confidence back, after they have their life back, after they have their time with their family back,” Nazerali said. “That’s what makes it really rewarding.”

Previously: Why become a doctor? A personal story from a Stanford oncologist, Students draw inspiration from Jimmy Kimmel Live! to up the cool factor of research careers and Stanford’s senior associate dean of medical education talks admission, career paths

Emergency Medicine, Medical Education

“We are a team”: Advice for new residents from chief residents, in their own words

"We are a team": Advice for new residents from chief residents, in their own words

1024px-Flickr_-_Official_U.S._Navy_Imagery_-_U.S._Naval_Academy_plebes_carry_a_log_as_part_of_teamwork_training_during_Sea_Trials.There are many things chief residents want new residents to know right out the gate, but much of that goes unsaid. So the blog Academic Life in Emergency Medicine recently put together a list titled “Dear Residents: 10 Things Your New Chiefs Want You to Know.” Each one was written by a different chief resident, as part of the blog’s Chief Resident Incubator project.

It’s a thoughtful collection of reflections that offers an interesting mix of poignant comments and practical advice. The full list is worth a read, but a few stand out:

 “WHEN YOU FEEL LIKE CRYING, CRY TO ME.”

…Know that every one of your attendings and senior residents continue to go through these same trials. When you find yourself on the ropes and feeling utterly alone, call us. We might not be able to make that Surgical ICU rotation any less painful, but we’ll at least buy you a beer and share some stories from our own days working the surgery salt mine.

(Rory Stuart, Chief Resident, Wright State University, Dayton, OH)

WE ARE A TEAM

…Our learning should not only take place during scheduled conference time; we can all learn from each other. Share your successes and failures. Teach us all what you know, and what you wish you would have known. When we get out on our own, we all represent this residency program. Together we can make each other and this program better.

(Valerie Cohen, Chief Resident, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE)

NEITHER RESIDENCY NOR LIFE ARE FAIR. USE IT AS AN OPPORTUNITY TO SHINE

…Your week long string of night shifts was not borne of malice or vendetta. We try to make decisions that are in the best interest of the program and we ALWAYS consider your requests.

Your faculty, chiefs, and colleagues are paying attention to how you react to these perceived slights. When you take that extra shift in stride, we’ll notice. When you take on a task that nobody else stepped up for, we’ll notice. When you swap into a weekend night shift so a co-resident can celebrate an anniversary or birthday, we’ll notice.

(Jimmy Lindsey, Chief Resident, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL)

Previously: Soon-to-be medicine resident reflects on what makes a good teacher, Keeping an even keel: Stanford surgery residents learn to balance work and life and A call to action to improve balance and reduce stress in the lives of resident physicians
Via Wing of Zock
Photo by U.S. Navy

Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Science, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine grads urged to break out of comfort zone, use science to improve human health

Stanford Medicine grads urged to break out of comfort zone, use science to improve human health

On Saturday, 195 graduates of the School of Medicine sat under a large white tent on the Alumni Green pondering the next chapter in their medical training. Many of them hadn’t been sure if they would make it to this milestone and, for some, the future seemed uncertain. But the message from Lucy Shapiro, PhD, a recipient of the National Medal of Science, was clear, “Step out of your comfort zone and follow your intuition,” she said. “Don’t be afraid of taking chances. Ask, ‘How can I change what’s wrong?'”

Shapiro told the Class of 2015 how she spent years performing solitary work in the laboratory before she “launched a one-woman attack” to influence health policy and battle the growing threat of infectious disease on the global stage. My colleague Tracie White captures Shapiro’s powerful speech in a story today about the commencement ceremony:

Her attack began with taking any speaking engagement she could get to educate the public about antibiotic resistance; she walked the corridors of power in Washington, D.C., lobbying politicians about the dangers of emerging infectious diseases; and she used discoveries from her lab on the single-celled Caulobacter bacterium to develop new, effective disease-fighting drugs.

Her lab at Stanford made breakthroughs in understanding the genetic circuitry of simple cells, setting the stage for the development of new antibiotics. Shapiro told the audience that over the 25 years that she has worked at the School of Medicine, she has seen a major shift in the connection between those who conduct research in labs and those who care for patients in clinics.

“We have finally learned to talk to each other,” said Shapiro, a professor of developmental biology. “I’ve watched the convergence of basic research and clinical applications without the loss of curiosity-driven research in the lab or patient-focused care in the clinic.”

grads walkingShapiro went on to tell the audience that bridging the gap between the lab and the clinic “can make the world a better place.” Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, agreed with these sentiments and told graduates that there has never been a better time for connecting advances in basic research with breakthroughs in clinical care. “You are beginning your careers at an unprecedented time of opportunities for biomedical science and for human health,” he said.

The 2015 graduating class included 78 students who earned PhDs, 78 who earned medical degrees, and 39 who earned master’s degrees. Among them was Katharina Sophia Volz, the first-ever graduate of the Interdepartmental Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. “Everybody here is reaching for the stars. We can do the best work here of anywhere,” she said.

Previously: Stanford Medicine’s commencement, in pictures, Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicineStanford Medicine honors its newest graduatesNational Medal of Science winner Lucy Shapiro: “It’s the most exciting thing in the world to be a scientist” and Stanford’s Lucy Shapiro receives National Medal of Science
Photos by Norbert von der Groeben

Medical Education, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine’s commencement, in pictures

Stanford Medicine's commencement, in pictures

Congratulations to Stanford Medicine’s Class of 2015! They were honored during a commencement ceremony on campus on Saturday morning, and photographer Norbert von der Groeben was there to capture the smiles, cheers and (happy) tears.

Previously: Coming up: A big day for Stanford Medicine’s Class of 2015, Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicine and Stanford Medicine honors its newest graduates
Photos by Norbert von der Groeben

Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Coming up: A big day for Stanford Medicine’s Class of 2015

Coming up: A big day for Stanford Medicine's      Class of 2015

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Tomorrow, Stanford Medicine’s graduating class will walk away from campus with a new title: Doctor!

The speaker for the medical school commencement will be Lucy Shapiro, PhD, whose unique worldview has revolutionized the understanding of the bacterial cell as an engineering paradigm and earned her the 2014 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize and the National Medal of Science in 2013. The diploma ceremony will be held on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Alumni Green in front of the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge.

All of us at Scope wish the very best for the new graduates.

Previously: Match Day at Stanford sizzles with successful matches & good cheer, Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicine and Stanford Medicine honors its newest graduates
Photo by Andrew

Medical Education, Mental Health, Nutrition, Stanford News, Surgery

Keeping an even keel: Stanford surgery residents learn to balance work and life

Keeping an even keel: Stanford surgery residents learn to balance work and life

med students in sailboat

Residency is one of the most intense times in a surgeon’s training, and it can take a toll physically and mentally on newly minted medical school graduates as they learn to cope.

To help them counter that stress, Stanford’s Department of Surgery started the Balance in Life Program for its residents. The program, and one of its team-building exercises – a sailing lesson in one of the world’s best sailing spots, the San Francisco Bay – were highlighted in a recent Inside Stanford Medicine story.

As described in the piece, the program is dedicated to the memory of Greg Feldman, MD, a former chief surgical resident at Stanford who committed suicide in 2010. The program provides basics like easy-to-access healthy meals, group therapy sessions and social activities, and Ralph Greco, MD, the program’s director said of it:

A lot of people would argue with the notion that such a program is necessary… I know our day of sailing may raise some eyebrows, but our faculty decided that we should do whatever we could to give these young people the tools they need to help them deal with the vicissitudes of life and medicine through the rest of their careers.

The article also notes that the program attracts residents interested in work-life balance to Stanford:

“The fact that we have this Balance in Life Program is great for recruitment of like-minded individuals,” [resident Micaela Esquivel, MD,] said. “I can tell medical students considering us that they would be hard-pressed to find another program that cares enough about their well-being to offer what we do.”

Previously: A call to action to improve balance and reduce stress in the lives of resident physicians, Surgeon offers his perspective on balancing life and work, Program for residents reflects “massive change” in surgeon mentality and New surgeons take time out for mental health
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

Cancer, Medical Education, Stanford News, Surgery, Videos, Women's Health

Why become a doctor? A personal story from a Stanford oncologist

Why become a doctor? A personal story from a Stanford oncologist

Why become a doctor? It certainly isn’t easy, and it requires years of study and a sizable financial investment. If you ask physicians how, and why, they selected their careers, you’ll get a variety of stories that offer insight into the many benefits of pursuing medicine.

Pelin Cinar, MD, a GI oncologist here, tells her own story in this recent Stanford Health Care video.

As a child, Cinar was impressed with the respect her uncle, a gynecologist, received from family members. Then, in high school, her mother was diagnosed with cancer. Meanwhile, she began pursuing the courses that matched her interest in science. Her mother recovered but then relapsed when Cinar was in college and taking pre-med requirements.

During her medical education at the University of California-Irvine, Cinar discovered that all of her favorite rotations and subjects were based on oncology. “It took off from there,” she says in the video.

Previously: Students draw inspiration from Jimmy Kimmel Live! to up the cool factor of research, Stanford’s senior associate dean of medical education talks admissions, career paths and Thoughts on the arts and humanities in shaping a medical career

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