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Women's common sex complaints not being adequately addressed

When it comes to treatments for women's common sex complaints, more research is needed. That's the conclusion of investigators who reviewed 101 studies on female orgasm disorder, a condition defined as a persistent delay in or absence of orgasm during sex.

The researchers found that literature on the disorder's prevalence (approximately 25 percent of women) and causes (various biological and psychosocial factors) was abundant, but reports on successful treatments were lacking. From a LiveScience article:

"We're not doing enough research," said Waguih William IsHak, a psychiatrist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and the lead author of the paper. "There are a lot of great clinicians who work with patients using therapy, but when it comes to medications, it's all trial and error."

The findings, which appear in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, are not all discouraging. The researchers note there is promising data on several potential therapies, suggesting "that disorders of orgasm in women, once properly understood, can eventually be successfully treated."

It should also be noted that some medical centers, including Stanford, have dedicated programs to help women with sexual health issues.

Via Medical News Today
Photo by AbigailGeiger

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