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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 2

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 2

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Hawkeye Pierce (i.e. Alan Alda) teaches scientists how to better communicate about their work: During a recent workshop with Stony Brook University’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, Stanford scientists practiced speaking and writing effectively about their work and learned which theater skills could be useful in building public interest in research.

Humble anti-fungal pill appears to have a noble side-effect: treating skin cancer: A new study led by Stanford dermatologist Jean Tang, MD, PhD, shows that a common anti-fungal treatment called itraconazole may be useful in treating basal cell carcinoma – the most common form of skin cancer.

The remarkable impact of yoga breathing for trauma: In this piece, Emma Seppala, PhD, associate director of Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, discusses the effectiveness of yoga breathing for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

You are what you read: The academic diet of the 21st-century medical student: Here, third-year medical student Mihir Gupta discusses the recent explosion of printed and digital medical resources that offer students alternatives to the classic texts that previous generations swore by. Gupta’s piece is the third installment in Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series.

Another piece of the pulmonary-hypertension puzzle gets plugged into place: A new study led by Marlene Rabinovitch, MD, and her colleagues at Stanford’s Vera Moulton Wall Center provides more insight on pulmonary hypertension, a dangerous increase in the pressure of blood vessels in the lung.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

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