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How parents and kids can have a happier – and healthier – Halloween

Tangarine pumpkin 560x372When I was a kid, the ghosts and ghouls of Halloween were the scariest things around. Now that I'm older, the terrors of Halloween have taken on a different form: Pumpkin-shaped pails that put fun-sized candies within easy reach, Halloween-themed cupcakes and cookies too cute to be "bad" for you and bulk bags of holiday treats at bargain prices.

If you're a parent who's trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle for your kids and yourself, these treats can quickly eat away all the hard work you put into developing healthy diet habits. So how can you get through this season of excess eating unscathed? On the Healthier, Happier Lives Blog, Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit, PhD, a clinical psychologist with Stanford's Eating Disorders Research Program, offers these tips:

Be flexible

Parenting is all about flexibility. Just as you plan on going on a trip, but something happens and you find yourself modeling to your children how you adapt to a changing environment, Halloween is not a challenge most parents have not dealt with thus far. You have probably spoken in the past with your child about how your habits and preferences as a family may be different from their friends’; you have likely taught them about the food pyramid and how different foods affect their bodies; and you have already experienced making decisions that your kids did not like.

Know your limits

A possible approach to Halloween is comprised of first knowing your limits – how many sweets and candies you think would be OK for your child? The answer may change according to your child’s age. For younger children, providing smaller baskets, allowing only a few treats during Halloween and saving a few treats for the following weeks would be acceptable. With older children, you can discuss their ideas and understandings how to go about the sweet celebration.

Recognize there's more to Halloween than food

When you and your children have a clearer understanding of your approach to Halloween, take this external opportunity to have fun! Wear a costume, extend your “persona” boundaries, and enjoy the non-food parts of this wonderful celebration. After all, isn’t this what Halloween is all about?

Previously: Eat well, be well and enjoy (a little) candyTips from a doctor (and a mom) for a safe Halloween and How to avoid a candy-coated Halloween
Photo by Pietro Bellini

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