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Most popular 1:2:1 podcasts of 2015

As the end of the year approaches, a look back at the 1:2:1 podcasts that you listened to most.

RoncaroloDays are long, years are short: Paul Kalanithi on time: Stanford neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi, MD, touched many lives by writing and talking openly about disease and mortality before dying of lung cancer last March. This interview is the companion to "Before I go", a beautiful Stanford Medicine magazine piece he wrote about his changing perception of time.

A conversation with the happiest man on Earth: Molecular biologist-turned-Buddhist monk and best-selling author Matthieu Ricard has been touring to spread his belief that “altruism is the vital thread that can address the main challenges of our time, from economic inequality to environmental sustainability, from life satisfaction to conflict resolution.” While visiting campus last spring, he stopped to talk with 1:2:1 host Costello about altruism, the meaning of happiness, and the power of meditation.

Maria Grazia Roncarolo on fast-tracking stem cell and gene therapy to the clinicMaria Grazia Roncarolo, MD, was recruited to Stanford Medicine in 2014, to lead efforts in fast-tracking stem cell and gene therapy to the clinic and to bring basic-science discoveries to patients. Here, she talks about her work and about Stanford's Childx, a TED-style conference focused on inspiring innovation in pediatric and maternal health.

Dean Lloyd Minor on his vision for Stanford Medicine: It’s been three years since Lloyd Minor, MD, took the helm as dean of Stanford's medical school, and he talks about his time here and his plans for the future during this interview. Saying “this is an extraordinarily exciting place to work – a place where it’s easy to get out of bed in the morning with enthusiasm about what lies ahead in the day,” Minor goes on to talk about Stanford Medicine’s vision to lead the biomedical revolution, the promise of precision health, and his commitment to diversity.

How would you like to die? A conversation with Stanford's VJ PeriyakoilVJ Periyakoil, MD, director of Stanford’s Palliative Care Education and Training, recently launched the Stanford Letter Project, a campaign to empower adults to take the initiative to talk to their doctor about what matters most to them at life’s end. In this podcast, she discusses the project and why it’s so important for patients to tell their doctors and family members about their end-of-life wishes.

Previously: Heart disease, old brains and happiness: Looking back on some of the year’s best 1:2:1 podcasts
Photo of Maria Grazia Roncarolo by Norbert von der Groeben

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