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In this Q&A, Stanford hospitalist Eric Strong discusses his YouTube channel, Strong Medicine, and his interest in medical education.

In this Q&A, Stanford hospitalist Eric Strong discusses his YouTube channel, Strong Medicine, and his interest in medical education.

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Medical terminology standardizes the language physicians use, but it can created distance with patients, writes Stanford medical student Tasnim Ahmed.

Medical terminology standardizes the language physicians use, but it can created distance with patients, writes Stanford medical student Tasnim Ahmed.

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A day in the life of Stephanie Chao, a Stanford pediatric surgeon, researcher and mother trying to live in the moment and balance the chaos.

A day in the life of Stephanie Chao, a Stanford pediatric surgeon, researcher and mother trying to live in the moment and balance the chaos.

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When he can't find time to fix the main light in his apartment, Stanford MD/PhD student Tim Keyes reconsiders the meaning of work-life balance.

When he can't find time to fix the main light in his apartment, Stanford MD/PhD student Tim Keyes reconsiders the meaning of work-life balance.

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In the Spotlight: Daniel José Navarrete is living his dream of becoming a scientist in the same Stanford labs where his grandfather worked as a janitor.

In the Spotlight: Daniel José Navarrete is living his dream of becoming a scientist in the same Stanford labs where his grandfather worked as a janitor.

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Former and current Stanford medical students recommends several nonfiction books — as well as authors —that present science through a humanistic lens.

Former and current Stanford medical students recommends several nonfiction books — as well as authors —that present science through a humanistic lens.

A Stanford medical student uses images from pathology to tell a story about the medical ethics of screening for prostate cancer.

A Stanford medical student uses images from pathology to tell a story about the medical ethics of screening for prostate cancer.

Should diseases be named after people? This conclusion of a two-part series looks at the arguments for using biologically-descriptive names, not eponyms.

Should diseases be named after people? This conclusion of a two-part series looks at the arguments for using biologically-descriptive names, not eponyms.

Mr. X’s fingers were dying, and several were already dead, casualties of a vascular disease. It would help if the patient quit smoking. He politely refused.

Mr. X’s fingers were dying, and several were already dead, casualties of a vascular disease. It would help if the patient quit smoking. He politely refused.

Should diseases be named after people? This first of a two-part series includes arguments to continue using medical eponyms.

Should diseases be named after people? This first of a two-part series includes arguments to continue using medical eponyms.

In the Spotlight: Stanford fellow Jeffrey Bien reflects on his 15 minutes of Internet fame and his work as a cancer specialist in training.

In the Spotlight: Stanford fellow Jeffrey Bien reflects on his 15 minutes of Internet fame and his work as a cancer specialist in training.

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The dizzying process of residency interviews prompted Stanford medical student Yoo Jung Kim to think about what it means to share your personal story.

The dizzying process of residency interviews prompted Stanford medical student Yoo Jung Kim to think about what it means to share your personal story.

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Stanford experts have developed a new way to get a granular view of people's onscreen lives, enabling them to ask questions linking online life and health.

Stanford experts have developed a new way to get a granular view of people's onscreen lives, enabling them to ask questions linking online life and health.

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Working on a global health project in Bangladesh, Stanford medical student Tasnim Ahmed learned that a familiar place can have an unfamiliar medical culture.

Working on a global health project in Bangladesh, Stanford medical student Tasnim Ahmed learned that a familiar place can have an unfamiliar medical culture.

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