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Cancer, Research, Science, Stanford News, Surgery, Technology

New molecular imaging could improve bladder-cancer detection

New molecular imaging could improve bladder-cancer detection

Joseph LiaoThey say a picture is worth a thousand words. For bladder-cancer surgeons, an image can be worth many lives.

That’s because a crucial method for detecting bladder cancer is to produce images that allow surgeons to identify abnormal-looking tissue, a method called cystoscopy. In a study published yesterday in Science Translational Medicine, Stanford researchers developed a new way to image the bladder that they say could detect bladder cancer with more accuracy and sensitivity than the standard methods. As described in our press release:

 The researchers identified a protein known as CD47 as a molecular imaging target to distinguish bladder cancer from benign tissues. In the future, this technique could improve bladder cancer detection, guide more precise cancer surgery and reduce unnecessary biopsies, therefore increasing cancer patients’ quality of life.

Identifying cancerous tumors can be challenging — some bladder cancer treatments cause inflammation, which looks very similar to abnormal, cancerous tissue. The only way to know for sure is to perform a biopsy, which can be stressful for the patient. As co-senior author Joseph Liao, MD, explained:

 Our motivation is to improve optical diagnosis of bladder cancer that can better differentiate cancer from non-cancer, which is exceedingly challenging at times. Molecular imaging offers the possibility of real-time cancer detection at the molecular level during diagnostic cystoscopy and tumor resection.

For their work, the researchers looked for a target that would distinguish cancer cells from benign cells and found it in CD47, a protein on a cell’s surface that cancer cells produce in higher quantities than normal cells. In previous work, co-senior author Irving Weissman, MD, developed a CD47 antibody that binds to the cancer cell’s surface and blocks the signal. They hypothesized it would be a good imaging target. More from our release:

 To test their hypothesis, the researchers added a fluorescent molecule to an antibody that binds to CD47. The modified antibodies were then introduced into intact bladders, which had been surgically removed from patients with invasive bladder cancer. Because they bladders were kept in good condition, the study’s imaging methods mirrored the way an urologist might use with a real patient.

After 30 minutes, they rinsed the bladder, so only the antibodies that bound to the CD47 protein remained. When they shine the tumor was exposed to with fluorescent light, the cancer cells “lit up” whereas normal or inflamed cells did not.

“Our goal through better imaging is to deliver a higher- quality cancer surgery and better cancer outcomes,” Liao told me. “I am very excited about the potential to translate our findings to the clinics in the near future.”

Previously: Healing hands: My experience being treated for bladder cancer, Drug may prevent bladder cancer progression, say Stanford researchers, Cellular culprit identified for invasive bladder cancer, according to Stanford study and Mathematical technique used to identify bladder cancer marker
Photo of Liao by Norbert von der Groeben

Biomed Bites, Cancer, Dermatology, Genetics, Research, Videos

Spotting broken DNA – in the DNA fix-it shop

Spotting broken DNA - in the DNA fix-it shop

It’s Thursday. And here’s this week’s Biomed Bites, a weekly feature that highlights some of Stanford’s most innovative research and introduces Scope readers to innovators in a variety of disciplines.

Neon green streaks across the screen. The phrases “End mismatched ligation” and “Repair of DNA double-strand breaks” flash at me. Did I stumble across an online, genetic fix-it shop? Sort of -  in that Stanford biochemist Gilbert Chu, MD, PhD, studies broken DNA and has a website to match.

Chu describes his research in the video above: “We started out in the lab trying to understand and recognize DNA that’s been damaged by ultraviolet radiation, which causes skin cancer. This led to the discovery of a protein that turned out to be missing in patients with a very rare disease called xeroderma pigmentosum.”

XP afflicts about 1 in 1,000,000 people in the United States. Without the protein Chu mentioned, mutations and damage accumulates in sufferers DNA, causes cancers and extreme sensitivity to the sun.

Chu’s team has also developed methods that allow other researchers to examine the expression of genes across an entire genome and to determine which cancer patients might be harmed by treatment with ionizing radiation.

“The reason I got interested in this research is that as a member of the Department of Medicine, I am an oncologist and I’m very interested in trying to help cancer patients,” Chu said.

Learn more about Stanford Medicine’s Biomedical Innovation Initiative and about other faculty leaders who are driving forward biomedical innovation here.

Previously: Skin cancer linked to UV-caused mutation in new oncogene, say Stanford researchers, Radiation therapy may attact circulating cancer cells, according to new Stanford study and How ultraviolet radiation changes the protective functions of human skin

Cancer, In the News, Nutrition, Patient Care, Surgery

“Prehab” routines before cancer surgery help patients bounce back faster

Surgery_flickr_thinkpanamaIf you’ve ever had surgery, especially an orthopedic one, you’ve probably had rehabilitation therapy. In recent years, orthopedic surgery plans have begun to include a period of “prehabilitation” exercise to help prepare patients for their procedure. Now, researchers have demonstrated that a pre-surgery work-out routine combined with some dietary changes may be able to help cancer patients regain their baseline strength levels sooner. A story on NPR’s Shots blog described the recent study:

Researchers from McGill University in Montreal studied 77 patients scheduled for colorectal cancer surgery. A kinesiologist gave the patients aerobic exercises and strength training to do at home. A registered dietitian gave them nutritional counseling and prescribed a whey supplement to make up any protein deficits, and a psychologist provided anxiety-reducing relaxation exercises.

Half of the patients were told to start the program before surgery – an average of about 25 days before – and to continue afterward for eight weeks. The other group was told to start right after surgery.

Not surprisingly, the group assigned to prehabilitation did better on a presurgery test that measured how far they could walk in 6 minutes. And it paid off.

Two months after surgery, the prehabilitation group walked an average of 23.7 meters farther than when they started the study. Rehab-only patients walked an average of 21.8 meters less than when they started. (A change of 20 meters is considered clinically significant.) And a greater proportion of the prehabilitation group was back to baseline exercise capacity by then.

Because of the methology the researchers used, it’s not clear how the diet or the exercise prescribed in the pre-surgery regimen affected the outcome. Previous studies that looked at exercise-only regimens did not show post-surgery improvements. A larger study with a more varied pool of patients is likely needed for definitive answers.

Previously: Wellness after cancer: Stanford opens clinic to address survivors’ needs and A call for rehab services for cancer survivors
Photo by thinkpanama

Cancer, Patient Care, Stanford News, Videos

How a new Stanford program is helping transform cancer care

How a new Stanford program is helping transform cancer care

Earlier this week my colleague wrote about a new program where experienced nurses help newly diagnosed cancer patients navigate their medical care. The video above talks more about the program (“We want to take the fear away from our patients and their family,” explains oncologist Oliver Dorigo, MD, PhD) and how it fits into Stanford’s efforts to transform cancer care.

Previously: Pioneering cancer nurses guide patients through maze of care, Ironman of Stanford Women’s Cancer Center and Director of the Stanford Cancer Institute discusses advances in cancer care and research

Cancer, Events, Genetics, Imaging, Stanford News, Surgery, Women's Health

Don’t hide from breast cancer – facing it early is key

Don't hide from breast cancer - facing it early is key

cat_hiding-pgMy cat suffers from acute anxiety. Although she and I have lived together for more than 12 years, and the worst thing I’ve ever done to her was cut her nails, she’s terrified of me. (She’s also very smart – she runs from the sound of my car, but not my husband’s). During trips to vet, Bibs hides her eyes in the crook of my elbow.

It’s a strategy that’s only minimally effective. After all, what I can’t see, or don’t recognize, can still hurt me.

Take breast cancer. It terrifies most women. And if you don’t look for it, you won’t find it. But if you do look, and find it early, you might save your life and your breast, says Amanda Wheeler, MD, a Stanford breast surgeon. She joined other Stanford breast cancer experts at a recent public program sponsored by the Stanford Women’s Cancer Center called “The Latest Advancements in Screening and Treatment for Breast Cancer.”

“One of our biggest challenge is women are scared of breast cancer, but[we have to get] the word out that we have such great advances, we’ve just got to catch it early,” Wheeler said.

She pointed to a tiny dot on a screen. At that size, Wheeler said, breast cancer is almost 100 percent curable. She performs a small lumpectomy. If it’s a little bigger, she can still probably save the nipple.

And if the entire breast must be removed, surgeons like Rahim Nazerali, MD, come in. Nazarali explained the importance of choosing a reconstruction surgeon carefully: The doctor should be accredited by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and have experience with microsurgery, preferably on the breast. There are different ways to remold a breast and doctors can use either a synthetic implant or a patient’s own tissue, from their abdomen, hips or thighs, Nazerali explained.

All of Wheeler and Nazerali’s artistry depends on expert imaging performed by specialists like Jafi Lipson, MD, whose message at the event was simple and encouraging.

Thanks to many new developments, mammography isn’t the only way to detect nascent breast cancers, Lipson said. Her team can employ 3-D mammography, or tomosynthesis, to reveal a layered look at a breast. And genetic screening, particularly for those with a history of breast cancer in the family, can provide the earliest warning signal of all, the breast cancer team said.

Women no longer need to hide their eyes from the risk, the experts emphasized. Women should take a peek – there’s help coping with what they may find.

Previously: Screening could slash number of breast cancer cases, The squeeze: Compression during mammography important for accurate breast cancer detection, Despite genetic advances, detection still key in breast cancer, NIH Director highlights Stanford research on breast cancer surgery choices, Breast cancer awareness: Beneath the pink packaging and Using 3-D technology to screen for breast cancer
Photo by Notigatos

Cancer, Events, In the News, Patient Care, Stanford News

A neurosurgeon’s journey from doctor to cancer patient

A neurosurgeon's journey from doctor to cancer patient

image.img.320.highEarlier this week, I had the chance to hear Stanford neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi, MD, discuss living with advanced-stage lung cancer in a conversation with palliative care specialist Timothy Quill, MD. The idea for the night’s event, which was held on the Stanford medical school campus, was to provide a good example of how the doctor-patient relationship can help improve quality of life for the very sick. On stage before a packed audience, Kalanithi, prodded by Quill’s gentle but pointed questions, told the story of how serious illness changed his life. As I wrote in an online story posted yesterday:

“Are there things in particular that you worry about now?,” asked Quill… a professor of psychiatry and medical humanities at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and an expert in end-of-life decision making. “Not really,” [Kalanithi] said. “I am sad at not seeing my daughter grow up, at probably not being here long enough for her to have a memory of me. I try to worry about things that are actually changeable. I worry about getting my book finished. I’d like to have that done for my daughter to know me.”

What surprised Kalanithi most about his life after being diagnosed with lung cancer was just how hard it was dealing with those “existential” questions, he told Quill:

“Having to deal with questions like, ‘What am I going to do with my life?’ was exceedingly difficult. After realizing I wasn’t going to die in weeks or months, figuring out what I was going to do with that time was a struggle.”

Kalanithi has reorganized his priorities since his diagnosis in May 2013, setting new priorities for a much shorter lifespan than he once expected – planning for years instead of decades. He and his wife got their finances in order, they had their first child July 4. Kalanithi said he has found solace in his love of poetry, and through his writing. Kick-starting a writing career that he had planned to start in 20 years was one of those changes.

In January, he wrote an op-ed piece for the New York Times about his cross over from physician to patient titled: “How long have I got left?” He told the audience how surprised he was at the overwhelmingly positive response he received to the story. “My own thoughts on something very personal, really resonated with people. I still get an email every other day in response to the New York Times piece. It’s a great inspiration to me to remember why writing is important.” [Editor's note: Kalanithi's recent Q&A here on Scope has also drawn massive attention; it's already one of our most popular posts of the year.]

Kalanithi’s final message, particularly to those young physicians and medical students in the audience, was to listen to your patients. Take time to get to know them. Remember why it is that you went to medical school. When asked if he treats his own patients differently since his diagnosis, he was characteristically thoughtful. “I think I felt a depth that I didn’t before… But I had excellent role models. I was trained you don’t just go over what are the risks and benefits. You really try to convey as much as you can about what it’s going to feel like.” He told his favorite example of a pediatric oncologist who he observed talking to parents whose daughter had just been diagnosed with a brain tumor. The doctor’s advice: “You need to support each other. You have to prepare your patients as much as you can for that larger emotional experiential landscape. You have to get enough sleep.”

Previously: “Stop skipping dessert:” A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness and No one wants to talk about dying but we all need to.
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

Cancer, Genetics, Medicine and Society, Research, Stanford News, Women's Health

Screening could slash number of breast cancer cases

Screening could slash number of breast cancer cases

dna-163466_1280Should every newborn baby girl be genetically screened to prevent breast cancer? Obviously, that isn’t cost-effective — yet. But if it were, would it be worthwhile?

A previous study said no. But research published today in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention by Stanford researchers suggests otherwise.

Led by senior author Alice Whittemore, PhD, the team examined 86 gene variants known to increase the chances of breast cancer. They created a model that accounted for the prevalence of each variant and the associated risk of breast cancer. Each possible genome was then ranked by the likelihood of developing breast cancer within a woman’s lifetime.

“It was quite a computational feat,” Whittemore told me.

Working with Weiva Sieh, MD, PhD; Joseph Rothstein, PhD; and Valerie McGuire, PhD, the team found that women whose genomes ranked within the top 25 percent of risk include 50 percent of all future breast cancers. Those women would then have the opportunity to get regular mammograms, watch their diets and make childbearing and breast-feeding decisions with the awareness of their higher risk. Some women might even select, as Angelina Jolie did quite publicly, to have their breasts removed.

“The main takeaway message is we can be more optimistic than previously predicted about the value of genomic sequencing,” Whittemore said. “But we still have a way to go in preventing the disease.”

“Our ability to predict the probability of disease based on genetics is the starting point,” Sieh said. “If a girl knew, from birth, what her inborn risk was, she could then make more informed choices to alter her future risk by altering her lifestyle factors. We also need better screening methods and preventative interventions with fewer side effects.”

“We want to focus on those at the highest risk,” Whittemore said.

Previously: Despite genetic advances, detection still key in breast cancer, NIH Director highlights Stanford research on breast cancer surgery choices  and Breast cancer awareness: Beneath the pink packaging 
Photo by PublicDomainPictures

Cancer, Patient Care, Stanford News

Pioneering cancer nurses guide patients through maze of care

Pioneering cancer nurses guide patients through maze of care

cancer-birminghamLearning you have cancer is a life-changing diagnosis. Even after the initial shock wears off, the gauntlet of medical care necessary to manage the disease can be overwhelming and confusing. At the Stanford Cancer Center, a new program that partners experienced nurses with newly diagnosed cancer patients aims to help the patients navigate the convoluted path their medical care can take.

A recent story in the Stanford Medicine Newsletter profiled Laura Birmingham, RN, (on the left, with cancer patient Sharron Brockman) and Vitale Battaglini, RN, who founded the new program. Birmingham coordinates care for patients with gynecological cancers and Battaglini works with head and neck cancer patients. They are the first people at the Stanford Cancer Center that patients meet and they stay in touch via phone calls, text messages and emails in between patient visits. The staff explained the benefits of a one-on-one program:

“Someone newly diagnosed doesn’t know what to expect, and things that seem basic to us are new to them. Our job is to be their first and main point of contact,” Battaglini said. “It’s a reversal of the traditional nurse’s role: We are the patient’s nurse, not the doctor’s nurse. And what the patient needs depends on that particular patient.”

“Cancer care has become so complex because it involves so many subspecialties,” said Julie Kuznetsov, director of the Cancer Patient Experience, who oversees the new program. “The field continues to evolve with new technologies and specialized expertise. While that means more options and better outcomes, for patients it has become more difficult to put the pieces together to coordinate their care.”

In Birmingham’s words, “Our role is to act as an agent of change in terms of the patient experience.” There are about 18 patients in the program, but that number is expected to grow quickly.

Previously: Stanford researchers examine disparities in use of quality cancer centers and Director of the Stanford Cancer Institute discusses advances in cancer care and research
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

Cancer, Events, Patient Care, Public Health

“Stop skipping dessert:” A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness

"Stop skipping dessert:" A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness

terminally_ill

Updated 10-23-14: Dr. Kalanithi spoke about this topic on campus earlier this week; more on the event, and his insights, can be found here.

***

10-20-14: When Paul Kalanithi, MD, a chief resident in neurological surgery at Stanford, was diagnosed at age 36 with stage IV lung cancer he struggled to learn how to live with conviction despite a prognosis of uncertainty. He found comfort in seven words from writer Samuel Beckett, “I can’t go on. I’ll go on.”

That mantra has given Kalanithi the strength to face his own mortality and have tough conversations with his wife and loved ones about the future. Tomorrow evening, he’ll join palliative-care specialist Timothy Quill, MD, for a discussion about end-of-life decision-making. The campus event is free and open to the public; no registration is required.

As a preview to the talk, Kalanithi talked with me about his experience as a patient and about the importance of end-of-life decisions.

How has your prognoses changed the way you talk to patients and their loved ones about grim news?

In large part, the way I talk to patients and their families hasn’t changed, because I had excellent role models in training. I remember witnessing a pediatric neurosurgeon talk parents through the diagnosis of their daughter’s brain tumor. He delivered not just the medical facts, but laid out the emotional terrain as well: the confusion, the fear, the anger and – above all – the need for support from and for each other. I always strove to emulate that model: to educate patients on the medical facts isn’t enough. You have to also find a way to gesture towards the emotional and existential landmarks.

Seeing it from the other side, it’s really hard, as a patient, to ask the tough questions. It’s important for the doctor to help initiate these conversations. I think it’s worth addressing prognosis and quality of life with patients, asking them what they think. My own assumptions about my prognosis were way off base. As a doctor, you can’t provide definite answers, but you can remove misconceptions and refocus patients’ energy.

Finally, I think, if you are the oncologist, it’s important to establish yourself as a go-to for any questions. Patients are bombarded with well-meaning advice, from dietary recommendations to holistic therapy to cutting-edge research. It can easily occupy all a patient’s time, when you ought to also spend time thinking about the priorities in your life. Physicians can also advise patients, as my dad would insist, that they can stop skipping dessert.

What is your advice to patients who are struggling with the certainty of death and the uncertainty of life?

I’ve written a little bit about facing terminal illness in The New York Times and The Paris Review. I found the experience difficult. I still find it difficult. It is a struggle. The problem is not simply learning to accept death. Because even if you do come to terms with finitude, you still wake up each morning and have a whole day to face. Your life keeps going on, whether you are ready for it to or not.

In some ways, having a terminal illness makes you no different from anyone else: Everyone dies. You have to find the balance – neither being overwhelmed by impending death nor completely ignoring it.

You have to find the things that matter to you, in two categories. The first is of ‘the bucket list’ sort. My wife and I always imagined revisiting our honeymoon spot on, say, our 20th wedding anniversary. But I didn’t realize how important to me that was until we decided to go back earlier (on our 7th anniversary, instead, about four months after I was diagnosed).

The second is, as all people should be doing, figuring out how to live true to your values. The tricky part is that, as you go through illness, your values may be constantly changing. So you have to figure out what matters to you, and keep figuring it out. It’s like someone just took away your credit card, and now you really have to budget. You may decide that you want to spend your time working. But two months later, you might feel differently, and say, you really want to learn saxophone, or devote yourself to the church. I think that’s okay – death may be a one-time event, but living with a terminal illness is a process.

Continue Reading »

Cancer, Stanford News, Videos, Women's Health

The squeeze: Compression during mammography important for accurate breast cancer detection

The squeeze: Compression during mammography important for accurate breast cancer detection

After nearly 30 years of reluctantly enduring the pain of mammography, I finally understand why I shouldn’t complain. In fact, I think I should embrace the pain and ask the technician to squeeze my breasts even more tightly between the shelves of the mammography machine.

It’s only a brief moment of pain, after all, but it can make the difference between a breast cancer detected and a breast cancer missed. In a recent video on the topic, Stanford Health Care’s Jafi Lipson, MD, an assistant professor of radiology, explains the very important reasons for women to step up and take the squeeze without complaint. It will only take 30 seconds of your time – and it might save your life.

Previously: Despite genetic advances, detection still key in breast cancer, NIH Director highlights Stanford research on breast cancer surgery choices and Breast cancer patients are getting more bilateral mastectomies — but not any survival benefit

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