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Postdoctoral scholar Progga Sen reflects on her love of flowers and talks with physician Chitra Dinakar to learn more about the allergies they can cause.

Postdoctoral scholar Progga Sen reflects on her love of flowers and talks with physician Chitra Dinakar to learn more about the allergies they can cause.

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Type 1 diabetes starts out as a sneak attack by bad-actor antibodies. But scientists at Stanford and UCSF have developed an early-warning system.

Type 1 diabetes starts out as a sneak attack by bad-actor antibodies. But scientists at Stanford and UCSF have developed an early-warning system.

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Stanford scientists have dug up a defect at the heart of rheumatoid arthritis: a faulty "anchor" that should be tethering a key molecule to the spot inside immune cells where it has to be in order to do its job.  It seems this defect can be reversed with a not yet commercially available small-molecule drug.

Stanford scientists have dug up a defect at the heart of rheumatoid arthritis: a faulty "anchor" that should be tethering a key molecule to the spot inside immune cells where it has to be in order to do its job.  It seems this defect can be reversed with a not yet commercially available small-molecule drug.

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In a video, Stanford Children's Health's Healthier, Happier Lives Blog introduces a patient with celiac disease and discusses the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of the autoimmune disorder.

In a video, Stanford Children's Health's Healthier, Happier Lives Blog introduces a patient with celiac disease and discusses the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of the autoimmune disorder.

Rheumatoid arthritis and coronary artery disease share a common culprit: an important type of immune cell, called a macrophage, that has gone haywire. Stanford investigators have zeroed in on a molecular defect in macrophages' metabolic process that drives both disorders.

Rheumatoid arthritis and coronary artery disease share a common culprit: an important type of immune cell, called a macrophage, that has gone haywire. Stanford investigators have zeroed in on a molecular defect in macrophages' metabolic process that drives both disorders.